Sign & Digital Graphics

August '18

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72 • August 2018 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S ARCHITECTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL House of Signs is working on a carv- ing with some blue jays in it currently. It is milling the birds with a 1/16 bit, "which is about as big as a sewing needle you use for canvas," he says. "The smaller the bit the more detail you get but the longer the mill time you have also. It is not uncommon for some of our detailed Roger Cox says he really pushed the limits of what the CNC router could do when it created a vintage gas pump for a sign competition. (Photos courtesy of House of Signs) Lindsay Neathawk is making a name for herself in the museum replica business. She was commissioned to make her first museum replica for the Harvard University Semitic Museum. The museum had one of a pair of the Nuzi lions, which were lion sculptures discovered in northeastern Iraq. (Photo courtesy of Neathawk Designs) pieces with a small bit to run 24 to 36 hours straight on one piece." The company still uses its original Gerber 3-axis router with single bit capability, but many of its bigger projects have moved to its new MultiCam 3-axis machine, which has a six-tool docking station. Cox says he really pushed the limits of what the CNC router could do when his shop created a vintage gas pump for a sign competition. "Our goal was not only to produce a piece that would really wow the audi- ence and judges but we wanted to really showcase the capabilities of our machine. It is truly amazing what we created out of a four-sided piece," he says. Because the company is located in Frisco, which is near Colorado's biggest ski resorts, its work is seen by people from all over the world. "Our signs tell a story. They leave a lasting impression. That's the whole point. To give our clients these unique stamps that help their business grow and set themselves apart," he adds. Lindsay Neathawk, owner and designer at Neathawk Designs in Williamstown, Massachusetts, started off using a CNC router as a hobby. She bought a 2'x2' Shark CNC, which she outgrew in two months. She saved up to buy a bigger CNC a year later. She purchased a ShopBot 3-axis machine in 2011 and has been using it primarily to carve signs. Neathawk says she is always trying to push the envelope with her designs, always "trying to take the ordinary and make it unique and extraordinary." Along with signs, Neathawk is making a name for herself in the museum replica business. She was commissioned to make her first museum replica for the Harvard University Semitic Museum. The museum had one of a pair of the Nuzi lions, which were lion sculptures dis- covered in northeastern Iraq. The other one was on loan from the University of Pennsylvania. "They had the original lion but it's so heavy and it was also frail. They didn't want to send it on display but also needed the pair to do it," she says. They commissioned her to take the 3 D computer models that had been done of both lions and carve two sets of exact replicas. Her second museum piece was for Yeshiva University and was a scene from the Arch of Titus. The scene was

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