Sign & Digital Graphics

January '19

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60 • January 2019 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S ARCHITECTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL with numerous frame options, including wall-mounted frames, sus- pended signage, directories, ADA signage and table signs, all in a variety of styles and colors. Vista offers five different types of sign systems, including flat, square, light, sharp and curved. Vista only works with sign professionals. It doesn't sell to the end user but it will bend over backwards to help its sign company clients bid on jobs by working with architects, designers and users to draw up plans for the best wayfinding system. Vista subscribes to a service that tells it about all of the big U.S. projects coming up and then his team figures out where the projects are at, which sign shops might want to bid on the projects and comes up with a wayfinding plan, quote and sign schedule, with technical drawings, that its clients can use to bid the job. "We want the sign shop to get the contract. If I would go after the end users, it would be a totally different game, but I'm not in this game. I'm in the business of supporting sign shops," Bar says. Charlie Kelly Jr., president, CEO and owner of Clarke Systems in Allentown, Pennsylvania, says his company sells its wayfinding signage to dealers across the country. It does offer up its design expertise if a customer needs that service. Many of the company's customers will share floor plans with Clarke Systems to get help on where to place wayfinding signs, but sometimes the company will send a representative out and work with the customer, side-by-side, to find the best plan for the job. Like writing, companies that design wayfinding systems need to break down the information so that people are getting only the Photos courtesy of Howard Industries. Photo courtesy of Vista Systems.

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