Printwear

January '19

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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7 8 P R I N T W E A R J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 9 higher selling price as they are considered to be of greater value than a white shirt. Af- ter all, who wants just white shirts? Retail loves color. Light blue, yellow, light green, gray, tan, light pink, and other shades can all deliver a "retail ready" product. For peo- ple who want to make apparel a significant part of their sublimation business, printing on "colored garments" changes the calcu- lus of their market opportunity. An important consideration when select- ing a colored polyester shirt is its colorfast- ness while on the heat press. Unfortunate- ly, the color of some polyester fabrics will fade when exposed to the temperature(s) needed for sublimation leaving an unsight- ly faded rectangle where the press's platen made contact with the fabric. MATCHING COLORS USING COLOR CHARTS For accurate color matching, I suggest printing and pressing a color chart onto a variety of colored shirts. By doing so, you'll be able to easily see and compare the effect each shirt's color has on the chart's colors. You can request the color chart I use by emailing me at dgross@conde.com. PREVENTING TRANSFER CREASES When pressing shirts, it is easy to leave un- sightly transfer creases and marks that will not come out. To prevent these creases/ marks, place a foam pad under the shirt, cut it so that it is slightly smaller than the transfer, deckle the edge of the transfer paper by tearing each side of the paper creating a rough edge, and then press with just enough pressure to slightly compress the pad. STEPPING OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE It may have taken many years and been a result of growing competition, but Ford did start making cars in a variety of colors. Now it's time for you to introduce your clients to a variety of colored, sublimatable shirts. PW David Gross is the president of Condé Systems, Inc. For more than 25 years he has developed and built the Mobile, Alabama based company into the premier source for printers, substrates, and consumables serving the graphic art, photography, prepress, and desktop publishing industries. SUBLIMATING COLORS continued from page 71 Left: The color of some polyester fabrics will fade when exposed to the temperature(s) needed for sublimation leaving an unsightly faded rectangle where the press's plat- en made contact with the fabric, so always check with suppliers before pressing. Below: For accurate color matching, try printing and pressing a color chart onto a variety of colored shirts to easily see and compare the effect of each shirt.

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