Printwear

Recognized Supplier Guide ‘18

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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18 || P RI N T W E A R O C T O B E R 2 01 8 Top: In R G B mode, we used the red to help us represent the blond-bro wn contrasts and in- verted the chan- nel. When we set that infor mation in the blond grain color over the at bro wn guitar silhouette, it instantly ca me together to strike the mirror- ing in the photo. The sa me technique of extracting the darkest grains in the wood was done for the black ink used to darken areas necessary to i mitate the photo. Botto m: Our si mple approach to create the wood grain effect was to manipulate our photo and nd shado w, highlight, and a middle tone to create an illusion to represent the di mensions. nd shado w, highlight, and a middle tone. We were able to pull off that illusion because those represent the di mensions. We had more than wood to consider, though. Strings, the binding, the neck, and the tuners on the headstock all have different surfaces in s mall areas. On top of that, the strings were too s mall to achieve di mension, so we added about a pixel's width. Most of the black de nition is tonal as light and shado ws worked naturally but to avoid these areas lling in, we pulled the densities back. The breakdo wn lls would have textures added over the top later. In Photoshop, we knocked do wn the photo into base tonal ranges that together made up the i mage in its color previe w. The Channels vie w in grayscale gave us a feel for the output. In R GB mode we used the red to help us represent the blond-bro wn contrasts and inverted the channel. When we set that infor mation in the blonde grain color over the at bro wn guitar silhouette, it instantly ca me together to strike the mirroring in the photo. The sa me technique of extracting the darkest grains in the wood was done for the black ink used to darken areas necessary to i mitate the photo. Kno wing ho w much infor mation to knock out or delete fro m the bro wn in keeping detail was challenging. Halftone density and understanding ho w much of a color underneath will in uence a color printing on top co mes with plenty of mistakes and press ti me. We decided to print the black under the bro wn to darken the grain. We still had so me more values to mix in, na mely, white, gray, and black in the neck and face plates of the guitar. This photo's black wasn't a true black but instead had a lighter value. A little gray over - printing was just the trick. We ran 20 percent over 50 percent black ink and no white base. We left a little of the color's printing under with s mall percentages to help with blending and to build transi - tional colors. A little of the bro wn under the blonde created addi- tional values and several tones. Printing this wet-on- wet allo wed for the colors to blend. We didn't want a at appearance to the text although it's a basic font. Using Layer Effects, we added di mension and interest. We set up the text by creating a ne w layer and using the Type tool. With the Layer Style palette open we adjusted the Bevel and E mboss features. We made our depth a little thicker, so we had so me good areas to work with on the beveled edges. The last couple ele ments we added to tie everything together were a musical graph with a fe w notes and the word " Colorado" in script. This was done with the sa me Layer Style effects palette but with a highlight and no shado w bevel. We really wanted the white to be opaque, so we used 100 percent solid in those parts of the guitar. The black gar ment required more consideration so the colors wouldn't die, but there was plenty of bro wn ink to act as a mediu m tone bordering on dark and it held up nicely in its opacity. The light bro wns needed so me base since their tones were brighter. Our white printer or base plate is mostly backing the blonde and white. There was no need to base under any of the black areas on the inside of the guitar as we used that edge to darken the bro wns up. Again, we were trying to keep a natural look to the wood grain but not over work it at the sa me ti me. The design went on black, charcoal, and natural Ts. Si mple in its display, this year's Parker Days Ts were all a success, but par- ticularly this one. Plus, the auction raised so me serious coin for The Wounded Warriors Project, so we were happy to be a part of this positive event. F R O M S O F T W A R E T O S U B S T R AT E Top: The reference photo's black was a lighter value. A little gray over - printing was just the trick to correct this. We ran 2 0 percent over 5 0 percent black ink and no white base. Above: The nished design went on black, charcoal, and natural colored blanks.

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