Printwear

February '19

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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SCREEN PRINTING From Software to Substrate that the garment would show through and influence the industrial look of the surfa- ce. We applied the same technique to the Rouge Squadron text. The white printer was again critical in the design. It always is, as the colors would fall off or tint when printed on black with no white base. We used a royal blue where the darker hue fell off considerably with- out a base. Textures were knocked out of the base in a number of areas to take ad- vantage of additional color development. Once on press, the blue printed directly on the garment came out as deep navy while the based areas were bright. Once we brought the whole thing together, our col- ors were bright, and the image developed dimensions that truly exploded. After 45 lpi output on our computer-to- screen, we went with the white printer on a 156, flashed, smoothed, and then print- ed the balance of colors, and the highlight white last, all on 230s wet-on-wet at 35 N/ cm2. Triple-ply dual durometer squeegees were employed as well. We did white on 65/90/65 while the colors were done on 75/90/75 with minimal off contact and pressures. The ladies of Rouge Squadron were delighted with our efforts. They proudly wear their garments to all of their events and get compliments from other Star Wars fans. May the Force Be with You! PW Lon Winters learned screen printing from the bottom up, starting his 20-plus-year career reclaiming screens. He has won nearly 50 international industry awards and honors, published numerous articles, and led several industry seminars and workshops. Currently, he is president of Colorado-based Print This, Inc./GraphicElephants. com, an international consulting firm specializing in technical advances, plant design, layout, troubleshooting, productivity, quality analysis, and complete garment-embellishing solutions. Visit www.graphicelephants.com for more information. Contact Winters at lonwinters@aol.com. For the final design, we laid down the white printer, flashed, smoothed, and then printed the balance of colors, and the highlight white last. Left: The white printer was critical as the colors would fall off or tint when printed on black with no white base. Right: The use of the white meant that the blue printed directly on the garment came out as deep navy while the based areas were brighter blue. Left: While the Death Star was a big part of the design, it didn't need much detail. Right: However, the details of the costume were important to the members of the Rouge Squadron. 1 6 P R I N T W E A R F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 9

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