THE SHOP

March '19

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10 THE SHOP MARCH 2019 "LinkedIn remains one of the top go-to social media sites for recruiting," says Mazin. "You can find everyone from interns and administrative candidates, all the way up to vice presidents and CEOs." But is LinkedIn the best platform for the automotive aftermarket? Maybe the people who can best answer that question are sitting a few feet away from you. Ask your employees where they hang out in cyberspace, because your most prom- ising job candidates are likely populating the same venues. Maybe they are posting images on Instagram, or using popular hashtags on Twitter, or posting comments in a career group on LinkedIn. Wherever they go, you should follow. LAY THE GROUNDWORK You want to become an active social media player far in advance of your candidate search. That's because recruiting today is a two-way street. It's not just you looking for a new employee; it's a whole group of potential employees getting to know your business as a quality place to work. "It is not only you finding candidates, but candidates finding you," says Craig. "And they perform their due diligence also. They might decide you are not a good fit for them." People will be looking at the posts you make over time on your company Facebook page and at what you do on all of the other networks, according to the experts. "Establishing a long-term presence will give potential candidates a lot to see and digest," says Riggs. "They will be answering the question, 'Would I enjoy working with these people?'" Your task is to establish your reputation as the best place to work. "The most common mistake is to focus only on the job at hand, rather than on establishing relationships with people," says Riggs. If you make a professional effort to create an attractive online image, you can demand an equal level of professionalism from people who apply for work. "You can help assess the seriousness of each candidate by finding out how closely each has studied your social media pres- ence," says Riggs. "Try asking a question such as this: 'What was one thing on our Facebook page that you thought was inter- esting or made you want to talk with us?' Anyone who can't give a good answer may not be a promising enough contender." A related point: As you build a social media presence, think about more than just recruiting. "Ask how your social media activity fits into the rest of your organization," says Mazin. "Be aware that what you post will impact your company's marketing, sales and operations. Coordinate with others in your organization so you do not send out conflicting messages." BUILD YOUR PRESENCE Part of the secret to improving your online presence is to tie together all your Internet activities. Your social media posts can invite people to visit your website, for example. And once there, those people should be invited to view employment information. "There should be an easy way for visitors to find out where the job information is," says Mazin. "This can be as simple as a tab labeled 'Join Our Team' that takes visitors to your employment page." You can also profile your business in other ways. "Establish company pages on LinkedIn and Facebook, and other social media as appropriate," says Kleiman. On each, post invitations to visit your other sites, com- plete with links. An added benefit of using social media sites to find new workers is that posts reach workers who may not be actively seeking a new job, but are intrigued by your opportunity. Part of the secret to improving your online presence is to tie together all your Internet activities. Your social media posts can invite people to visit your website, for example. And once there, those people should be invited to view employment information. ONLINE RECRUITMENT

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