Printwear

March '19

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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1 6 P R I N T W E A R M A R C H 2 0 1 9 Our client was extremely happy with the outcome and couldn't wait to receive the garments so she could proudly dis- play them in the community of imagina- tion where we either continue to this day or hold onto in the memory of days long past. This is Glitch! PW Lon Winters learned screen printing from the bottom up, starting his 20-plus- year career reclaiming screens. He has won nearly 50 international industry awards and honors, published numerous articles, and led several industry seminars and workshops. Currently, he is president of Colorado-based Print This, Inc./GraphicElephants.com, an international consulting firm special - izing in technical advances, plant design, layout, troubleshooting, productivity, quality analysis, and complete garment-embellishing solutions. Visit www.graphicelephants.com for more information. Contact Winters at lonwinters@aol.com. dify with the softness set at 15 pixels. We kept it on a separate channel so we could remove it from the white printer to create secondary tones. We applied the same technique to the reflective blue quality in the fur and reduced the density to be subtler. The royal was dark, so we didn't reduce the density much at 50 percent opacity. By making a selection of the fades to create a mask, we airbrushed areas of interest. Once we had Glitch completely colored, we constructed our base so colors would pop in some areas and fall back in others. We got dark colors where we removed information and bright tones where the white was at full opacity. We made at least three different shades from each ink color, thus achieving multiple tones to create more colors with less. Simple but effective. The extra steps made a 2D image just a bit more 3D. Once seps were completed, we outputted on CTS. Because this was done in cartoon style, we chose a low frequency of 45 lpi at a 22.5-degree angle. After this homemade creation came to life, we wanted the most out of the printing. We ran the white printer on high tension N-166 tpi with a 65/90/65 triple-ply dual durometer squeegee. We flashed just long enough to gel the ink and kept it hot long enough to make it to the smoothing screen. Next were the colors in subsequent heads and the highlight white all wet-on-wet on N-272s using 75/90/75s. SCREEN PRINTING From Software to Substrate Top: After sketching our cartoon, we placed the drawing in Adobe Illustrator. The application of the line work broke up areas for colorization since Glitch was mostly black. Above left: Since the design would be going on a black substrate, we chose colors that complemented the dark character. We used blues and greens as reflective qualities and utilized strong lines. Above right: Our cartoon required a few defining qualities such as piercings, headphones, and a distinctive sweatshirt. After sketching our cartoon, we placed the drawing in Adobe Illustrator. The application of the Top: Once we had Glitch completely colored, we constructed our base colors so they would pop in some areas and fall back in others. Above: We made at least three different shades from each ink color, thus achieving multiple tones to create more colors with less. Top: After sketching our cartoon, we placed the drawing in Adobe Illustrator. The application of the After sketching our cartoon, we placed the drawing in Adobe Illustrator. The application of the

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