Sign & Digital Graphics

Recognized Supplier Guide ’19

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40 • March 2019 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S DIGITAL PRINTING AND FINISHING DIGITAL GRAPHICS Checkerboard A gray and white checkerboard is the universal indicator of transparency. When transparency is reduced on a layer, the checkerboard becomes vis- ible providing that there is no opaque content below the layer in the stack (See Figure 3). The color and size of the cells of the checkerboard can be changed with the Transparency & Gamut settings in the preferences (See Figure 4). It helps to change the checkerboard colors if you are working on a grayscale image, for example, as it makes the checkerboard easier to see. Global Transparency Transparency is applied globally to the entire currently selected layer when the opacity slider is dragged. There are instances when you may want to apply the same transparency setting to more than one layer. The best solution for this scenario is to place the layers in a single Layer Group. To create a group, select the layers and choose New Group from Layers from the Layers panel Option menu. Then adjust the opacity slider for the entire group. Local Transparency The process is a little different when you need to apply transparency to a specific region of an image. The most efficient method is to create a layer mask. A layer mask conceals and reveals regions of the image. The quickest way to make a layer mask is to click the Make Layer Mask icon in the Layers panel. When black is applied to the layer mask, the correspond- ing area on the image becomes completely transparent, that is, invisible. When white is applied the area is completely revealed, and when any shade Figure 3: When transparency is reduced on a layer, the checkerboard becomes visible. Figure 4: The color and size of the cells of the checkerboard can be changed with the Transparency & Gamut settings in the preferences. Figures 5a and 5b: On a Layer mask, black produces transparency, white produces opacity and gray pro- duces semi-transparency. A B

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