Printwear

April '19

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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1 6 P R I N T W E A R A P R I L 2 0 1 9 solutions, we created ovals for framing and that old signage look. We added some palm trees and sun for the Cali accent and to set up negative space for the title. Font choice was a classic slanted and warped op- tion that had nice rounded serifs and an old-time feel. We added the thickness by duplicating the font and placing it some distance behind the original and used the Blend Tool. The trick was to use the Blending Tool on the same point on both word solutions so that it stepped from point A to point B. We took some license and added woodcut grooves in the form of customized brushes that tapered on the ends. We didn't want solid ink in these ar- eas. The same grain was applied to the oval frame by making it a stroked object and removing the fill. Since it's a cantina, the cat would wear a sombrero and, naturally, a margarita was a no-brainer. For that sass, we incorporated some suggestive phrases for humor and a few lines in the background to break up the negative space. All vector elements were set in place after some sizing adjust- ments. Once opened in Photoshop, every el- ement was on its own layer so we could affect some areas and not others. Since we didn't have other colors to help define parts of the design, tonal ranges would be the magic. We would use variations to create multiple levels and push the type forward. Plank wood was perfect for this application. The spacing between the slats was a great source of breakup and less ink. Wood has many tonal values, so we used gray scales to create the illusion of the grain. The darkest value, the area between the boards, was completely knocked out so the garment defined it. The formula we considered with a one color was to break it down into three values: darkest, light- est, and a mid-tone. The garment was the darkest. The lightest value was discernible SCREEN PRINTING From Software to Substrate Left: For open space and type solutions, we created ovals for framing. Right: We added thickness by duplicating the font and placing it some distance behind the original and used the Blend Tool. Elements of the couples' personality were added for flair. Since we didn't have other colors to help de- fine parts of the design, tonal ranges were the magic touch. The darkest value, the area between the boards, was completely knocked out so the garment defined that space. Wood has many tonal values, so we used gray scales to create the illusion of the grain. The garment was the darkest value, while the lightest value appeared as light gray.

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