Printwear

April '19

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

Issue link: https://nbm.uberflip.com/i/1094827

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ACCORDING TO THE U.S. CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION (CPSC) WEBSITE, ALL CHILDREN'S PRODUCTS MUST: 1. Comply with all applicable children's product safety rules; 2. Be tested for compliance by a CPSC-accepted and accredited laboratory, unless subject to an exception; 3. Have a written Children's Product Certificate (CPC) that provides evidence of the product's compliance; and 4. Have permanent tracking information affixed to the product and its packaging where practicable. Decorators can find further details on acquiring a CPC, as well as a sample certificate at www.cpsc.gov/Testing-Certification/Childrens-Product-Certificate-CPC. O ne extra element that decorated kidswear brings to the table is the topic of safety and CPSIA (Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act) regulations. Because of this, producers need to jump through a few hoops to get the stamp of approval on their decorated items. This includes passing a collection of tests to ensure the garment fab - rics and any components used to decorate the substrate are safe for children. COMPLYING WITH SAFETY STANDARDS KIDSWEAR HIGHLIGHTS Before business owners can take a product to market, there are some style, fabric, and design highlights to cover. In some respects, today's kidswear takes a trip back four or five decades while bringing out the best of 2019. With the mix of old-school styles and new-school fabric blends, these are some of the trends seen in kidswear today: • Vintage raglan and ringer Ts • Heavyweight cotton basics • Blended fabrics • Sherpa hoodies/pullovers • Athleisure/performance • Unisex cuts • Flowy hemlines • Cold shoulder cutouts • Fringe details • Minimalist prints • Iconic nostalgia • Elements of humor Diving into artwork and design elements a little more, Parker says the standard for this industry is one- or two-color prints in- volving simple designs, symbols, phrasing, or branding. Along with vintage fabrics and styles taking center stage, vintage prints and distressed Ts are on the rise. "My kids—a 10-year-old boy and 8-year-old girl—are often hanging out wearing kid-size concert Ts from bands they've only heard as back- CHILDRENS WEAR new-school fabric blends, these are some of the trends seen in kidswear today: a little more, Parker says the standard for this industry is one- or two-color prints in volving simple designs, symbols, phrasing, or branding. Along with vintage fabrics and styles taking center stage, vintage prints and distressed Ts are on the rise. "My kids—a 10-year-old boy and 8-year-old girl—are 3 6 P R I N T W E A R A P R I L 2 0 1 9 Left: Details like ruffles, pleated sleeves, and backswing hemlines have upgraded the basic T. (Image courtesy MONAG Apparel) Right: Raglans in a variety of fabrics, sizes, and colors allow shops to grow their collection of offerings easily. (Images courtesy MONAG Apparel)

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