Sign & Digital Graphics

June '19

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44 • June 2019 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S DIGITAL PRINTING AND FINISHING DIGITAL GRAPHICS Figure 3: The calibration software generates screen images of several tonally different red, green, blue, gray, black and white color swatches that the colorimeter measures. Figure 4: The color chart that consists of multiple swatches of color is printed on the target device on the specific substrate. Figure 5: The chart is scanned with a spectropho- tometer that records the wavelength of each swatch. If you have a monitor with specific brightness and contrast controls, adjust them to the recommended settings. If not, the software will direct you to the automated calibration process that includes brightness and contrast adjust- ments. Both the Windows and Mac software programs are OK for a quick fix, but they rely on your observations to determine color accuracy, which is a subjective analysis. Colorimeter A better solution is a tristimulous col- orimeter that measures the temperature of the light displayed on screen. The colorimeter attaches to the screen and measures the color temperature, gamma, and white point of the display. The cali- bration software sequentially generates screen images of several tonally different red, green, blue, gray, black and white color swatches that the colorimeter analyzes and feeds back to the software. (Figure 3) Based on the analysis of the temperatures of projected swatches, the software writes a profile based on the colors on the chart and saves it to the appropriate folder. Screen to Print Matching Matching a print to a monitor is a bit more of an extensive process. After Figure 6: The default Color Settings dialog box.

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