RV PRO

July '19

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130 • RV PRO • July 2019 rv-pro.com B U S I N E S S regarding the customer's tow vehicle's capabilities for hitch work and electric brake controller needed? The reason I ask this question is that many times the infor- mation given to the service department on the sold PDI/ get- ready document is incorrect. As a result, the service department isn't aware what towing equipment the customer has (or doesn't have) on the day of delivery. This issue/concern will back-up the PDI or hitch work tech- nician, and more importantly, prolong the delivery process and most definitely upset a customer. So, this is an opportunity for the sales manager to hold salespeople accountable regarding acquiring this information, prior to them signing off on the get-ready. Additionally, sometimes the sales team may simply take the customer's word for granted as to what equipment they have or what their towing capabilities are. Or, quite frankly, maybe the customer just doesn't know the type of information that is being requested. Therefore, proper verification through pictures and docu- mentation work very well. For example: pictures of the vehicle's receiver set-up, box size (door jamb for wheelbase size), a pic- ture of factory or aftermarket e-brake currently in vehicle and take a picture of the inside of the box to understand what's in it, like a current hitch setup, or the type of plastic or sprayed bed liner in place. This information – forwarded to your PDI shop foreman/ dispatcher, PDI advisor, parts manager, and PDI/ hitch work tech – would be very valuable for a proper delivery day expe- rience. Also, your shop efficiency would increase overnight. If the customer's tow vehicle is not there to verify that infor- mation, you can certainly ask the customer to take appropriate pictures and share examples of what is needed and explain the benefit for delivery day. Obviously, the same type of information is requested for your service department personnel regarding tow bars and what setup will be needed. Dealership owners, if you think this step of the delivery process is not an issue, please gather up your delivery day per- sonnel and ask them, "Do you folks always have the correct information for the sold PDI or get-ready?" I strongly suspect the answer will be a resounding "no". Customer Expectations and Communication: Do your customers know and understand what will happen on the day of delivery pertaining to your dealership delivery process? Specifically, the time needed for a proper delivery on the day of delivery? If you don't explain the benefits of the day of delivery processes and the approximate times associated for each step, then you could be setting the customer up for wrongful expectations. Additionally, you can short-cut the opportunity to educate your customers properly during the demo process, hitch set-up, F&I benefits presentation, parts walk-through process, and service education. And I haven't even touched on the possibility of lost revenue during these presentations and education – purely because the customer had no idea the length of time for their delivery and did not prepare properly for this day. More times than not, your customers are back in your ser- vice drive, or business office requesting additional information or in need of service because their concerns either were not explained in their entirety, presented to its fullest potential, or just plain short-cutted because the customer said, "We need to get going; I didn't know it was going to take this long" or "if I would have known, I could have planned better, and maybe left the grandkids at home." Don't get me wrong, I'm all about family and this fun day of picking up a new RV, but the kids get tired, hungry and/or impatient and typically interrupt the above-mentioned presen- tations. When customers come back to the dealership because they are not operating something correctly, or unfortunately do not have a water regulator or surge protector and now have an issue, it typically costs you professionalism in the eyes of the customer – not to mention it costing you admin and tech time that you won't be able to collect on. The possibilities are endless for proper communication regarding informing the customer about the length of time they will be spending at the dealership on delivery day. Again, giving the customer benefits as to what will transpire in each department will increase proper expectations. Your F&I manager or delivery coordinator – if scheduling the day of delivery – should be on the front side of this edu- cation with your customers and should be acknowledging the length of time for the delivery. I typically will break down for the customer the specifics regarding what will happen in the following departments and with personnel on the day of delivery: • Business office (30 minutes to one hour) • Orientation/ demo tech (one to two hours just on travel trailers) • Hitch tech (30 minutes) • Parts department personnel (generally this is not for big-ticket items, as that gets done prior to the customer coming in for delivery) (15 to 30 minutes) If you don't explain the benefits of the day of delivery processes and the approxi- mate times associated for each step, then you could be setting the customer up for wrongful expectations. Additionally, you can short-cut the opportunity to educate your customers properly during the demo process, hitch set-up, F&I benefits presentation, parts walk- through process, and service education. " "

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