Printwear

September '19

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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2 0 1 9 S E P T E M B E R P R I N T W E A R 3 5 above about printing with low temperature plastisol inks, but unlike low temperature plastisol inks, you must use a carbon dye blocking underbase, not just on dye-submi- lated fabrics. Due to water-based ink's thin ink film, it can not block dyes by itself, even when using a low-cure additive. Temperature of your oven is also very im- portant with water-based inks because they are in the heat chamber longer than plastisol inks. Therefore, there is more opportunity to reach temperatures above 280 degrees F as thin polyester shirts heat up quickly. The last ink that can be used on poly- ester garments is silicone ink. Silicone is very adventageous to print with because it not only cures at lower temperatures, dye migration goes right through silicone ink, which means your final product does not show dye migration. Printing with silicone ink can be tricky because you must catalyze silicone ink as it cannot adhere to polyester garments by itself. Once catalyzed, most silicone inks are only good for three to four hours, so you must finish before the ink begins to cata- lyze on its own. There are techniques and nel. If you do not have a thermal donut probe, you may want to get one to ensure that your oven is running at the proper temperature. The next step is to choose the right ink. Choose an ink that is designed to run at lower oven temperatures, preferrably around 280 degrees F. Also choose one that has a fast flash as that helps to reduce the temperature under flash elements. Also note that just because an ink has a low cure temperature does not mean it is good for all fabric types. A low bleed, low tempera- ture ink may be great for tri-blends, but may not have enough bleed blocking char- acteristics and washfastness for polyester printing. For polyester printing you want to choose a low temperature ink that is designed for polyester. For dye-sublimated products as well as some poorly dyed poly- esters and blends, it may require a gray or black dye-blocker underbase to prevent dye migration in conjuction with your low temperature polyester ink. You can also print on polyester garments with a high solids acrylic water-based ink. You must adhere to all that was written Opposite: Printing athletic fabrics can be difficult, but with a few consid- erations and time for testing, it should be a home run. (All images courtesy the author) Above: This graphic shows the components of a screen print. above about printing with low temperature nel. If you do not have a thermal donut Opposite: Printing athletic fabrics can be difficult, but with a few consid erations and time for testing, it should be a home run. (All images courtesy erations and time for testing, it should be a home run. (All images courtesy the author) Above: This graphic shows the components of a screen print. Opposite: Printing athletic fabrics can be difficult, but with a few consid- Get 10 % Off your first order. Use coupon code NBM10 check website for local distributor LOW TEMP WHITE YETI ULT LOW TEMP WHITE APOCOLYPSE LOW TEMP INKS High Opacity Whites/Colors Flexible for Multiple Substrates No Ghosting Soft Hand Dye Test Kits for Polyester www.monarchcolor.com INKbetter, printbetter, bebetter

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