Printwear

November '19

For the Business of Apparel Decorating

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3 4 P R I N T W E A R N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9 Fruit of the Loom supports health and education programs for its employees across the globe. (Image courtesy Fruit of the Loom) Employees at a recent community event. (Image courtesy Charles River Apparel) The term 'community' has a handful of differ- ent meanings depending on who you talk to. For some, it refers to people in a small neigh- borhood or three-block radius. In other cases, it might refer to a whole county or municipality. On a broader scale, some bigger companies with a supply chain that spans the globe refer to all the countries involved in their operation as part of their 'community.' As part of our November issue, Printwear checks in with a few companies on how they define community outreach, and what they do to participate. CHARLES RIVER APPAREL CLOTHING FOR A CAUSE Launched in 2019 as an expansion of the company's Charles River Cares program, the initiative focuses on helping people in need. Why did the company decide to participate in this type of community outreach? "We care deeply about making a difference," comments the Lipsett family. "Clothing for a Cause allows us to spread awareness on charities that we believe in while involving our customers to help support impor- tant causes." What are the long-term goals of taking part in this project/initiative? Over the next 10 years, the company says they are committed to donating a combined total of more than $1 million to charity. The company also plans to make Clothing for a Cause an annual program part of Charles River Cares. Every year the program will feature new charities, aligning each charity with a specific product, to bring atten- tion to organizations that are doing important work.What do you hope your employees, clients, and industry peers learn from this? "That there are many ways to give back, whether it's giving product, making monetary contributions, or having employees volunteer," the company says. "There is so much opportunity to do more in our industry." FRUIT OF THE LOOM EDUCATION AND HEALTH SERVICE INITIATIVES Fruit of the Loom supports a wide range of health and education services for employees and their families across the globe. In Honduras, the company partners with the Honduras Institute of Social Security, state hospitals, and local volunteer doctors as part of this initiative. Since 2012, the program has provided more than 70,000 free consultations to employees and families. The company also part - ners with the Honduras Institute of Education to help employees receive their high school diploma. Why did the company decide to participate in this type of com- munity outreach? "In Honduras, we're one of the largest private employers, so we have a vested interest in improving the conditions and the quality of life for employees and their families," states Jeanene Edwards, VP of Fruit of the Loom/ JERZEES Activewear. What are the long-term goals of taking part in this project/initiative? "At Fruit of the Loom, we believe it is our responsibility to step in and help wherever we can, so when given the opportunity to support a great cause, we do so," says Edwards. "Plus, these efforts have a direct, positive impact on employee morale which helps with employee retention. Our goal is to improve conditions and the quality of life in all areas where we do business around the globe." What do you hope your employees, clients, and industry peers learn from this? "We hope that our outreach projects inspire and encourage our employees and peers to give back when given the opportuni- ty," states Edwards. "An added benefit—it's a great opportunity for team bonding. Working together for a greater cause brings people together." Lend a Hand

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