Sign & Digital Graphics

May '20

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2 4 • M A Y 2 0 2 0 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S Shelley Widhalm is a freelance writer and editor and founder of Shell's Ink Services, a writ- ing and editing service based in Loveland, Colorado. She has more than 15 years of experi- ence in communications and holds a mas- ter's degree in English from Colorado State University. She can be reached at shellsinkser- vices.com or shellsinkservices@gmail.com. Sign shops have multiple options for mounting hardware B Y S H E L L E Y W I D H A L M Sign shops can select from a vast number of sign mounting products to install all manner of signage from ban- ners to tabletop displays that attract customer interest. The products can be simple or ornate, such as a straightfor- ward design for a modern contemporary feel to a wrought iron style employing the use scrolls for an old town or historic look, and come in different size, shapes and substrates. When making the selec- tion, shops can follow the trends, avoid a few others and come up with unique and innovative ways to give their clients what they want. "There's so much stuff out there and so many different ways to create dis- plays and mounted displays, it matters the purpose you're looking for," says Steffan Phillippo, marketing director of Consort Display Group, a manufacturer of display products based in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Alpina Manufacturing LLC in Chicago, Ill., provides mounting hardware for sig- nage in the Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Over-sized banners are comprised of smaller rails that are joined together with straps resulting in a seamless finish. Image courtesy of Alpina Manufacturing. Mounts W hen it comes to hanging or displaying a sign, the mounting hardware may not get much attention but it is just as important for making the sign look better and last longer. "Many businesses look to sign shops to help advertise and promote their store from the street and sidewalk level," says Charlie Capps, director of the Sign Bracket Store in Carlsbad, California. "Signage is one of the first impressions businesses can give their customers, so it must done with charm, flair and sophistication, along with what the city ordinances and rules are pertaining to uniform signage." Image courtesy of Gyford Standoff Systems. Bracketing system courtesy of Consort Display Group. Brackets AND

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