GRAPHICS PRO

June '20

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A W A R D S & C U S T O M I Z AT I O N 6 6 G R A P H I C S P R O J U N E 2 0 2 0 G R A P H I C S - P R O. C O M S U B L I M A T I O N B A S I C S A N D B E Y O N D | C H E R Y L K U C H E K W hen it comes to heat pressing polyester, there are challenges that can cause people a lot of frustration. But don't let that stop you from forging ahead into what could be a very lucrative opportunity, especially with T-shirts and other polyester substrates. If you have experienced the frustration, you are certainly not alone. One of the most common questions asked in my Facebook group is, "How can I subli- mate a polyester T-shirt without the press lines?" TWO METHODS FOR SUCCESS Polyester fabrics have evolved over these past few years, and some of the substrates you would be surprised to learn they are polyester. Take, for instance, the linen polyester pillows that Condé Systems sells. Not only do they have the appear- ance of linen, but their texture and feel could make one believe they actually are linen. The same can be said for Vapor Apparel T-shirts, and how over the years they have come to look and feel more like cot- ton than polyester (not to mention how beautifully they sublimate). The good news is with Vapor Ap- parel T-shirts, you aren't limited to just white, but an array of other colors that you can sublimate. I have found two methods that have been successful for me in pressing T- shirts without press lines. The first is using Vapor Apparel's foam kit, and the other method is one that I discovered by trial and er- ror. That process is using parchment paper, which I will demonstrate later with a step-by-step tutorial. There are two ways that press lines can appear: one, your heat press leaves marks from the hard edge of the platen, and the other is through the hard lines from the trans- fer paper. You can deckle the edges of the transfer paper, which does help, but it How to SUBLIMATE POLYESTER WITHOUT PRESS LINES WHEN SUBLIMATING COLORS OTHER THAN WHITE, IT IS BEST NOT TO USE A DESIGN THAT HAS WHITE IN IT, AS IT WILL TAKE ON THE COLOR OF THE BACK - GROUND THAT YOU ARE SUBLIMATING. The items needed when using pressing method one (Vapor foam) for avoiding press lines. (All images courtesy Cheryl Kuchek) Foam method step one: measure your transfer (see tutorial for specific step-by-step instructions).

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