THE SHOP

August '20

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64 THE SHOP AUGUST 2020 A s a shop owner, you may look at repairs as a necessary evil. After all, if you are offering any kind of product, there are bound to be failures or defects from time to time. Of course, the percentage will depend on the types of products you're dealing with, but I have never seen a perfect product yet in my 28 years in business. This means that, someday, you'll have to work with a customer who may get frus- trated because of a malfunction, and then you'll have to work with the manufacturer that sometimes gives you a hard time about a replacement or quick repair method. It can be frustrating for all parties involved! The second part of repairs involves improper installations, and just like I have never seen a perfect product, I definitely have never seen a perfect technician. Some technicians "never make mistakes" and those are usually the worst offenders. Regardless of whether it's a product mal- function or an installation error, it takes time and effort to figure out the problem and find a remedy. Thus, the word repair gives us nightmares and can negatively affect our bottom line. THE UPSIDE OF REPAIR WORK What if I told you, however, that you can turn those nightmares into dreams? If you are installing many different types of products throughout your shop, chances are your team has probably developed an uncanny ability to diagnose problems and fix issues. Technicians already do it when there is a warranty issue, or when a repair is needed. They may have to do some investigating to see if the product failed or the install was bad or something else caused the mishap. So, with this kind of process and training already in place, consider simply turning this ability your shop already has into a revenue stream by diagnosing customers' problems and offering solutions. What are some ways to turn repairs into revenue? First, start by promoting the fact that you are, among other things, a repair specialist. Spend time creating some marketing (in your showroom, on your website, in your social media) talking about the fact that your team has years of experience in diag- nosing and fixing common issues. You don't need to say anything about JUST FIX IT! With a seasoned crew & plenty of product knowledge, 'repair' doesn't have to be a dirty word. By Josh Poulson "Repair" is some- times a dirty word for accessory shops that associate it only with product failures or improper installations. However, why not put your staff's expertise to good use by offer- ing simple repairs of common issues to create a new revenue stream?

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