GRAPHICS PRO

December '20

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G R A P H I C S - P R O. C O M 2 0 2 0 D E C E M B E R G R A P H I C S P R O 5 7 ABRASIVE OR GRIT SIZE Size does matter! The size of grit you use has a lot to do with the way your finished etchings look. The size of the grit is specified by a number, with the higher numbers denoting smaller particle sizes. A smaller grit size cuts slightly slower, but leaves a smoother finish on the glass. The larger grit sizes cut faster, but not significantly faster if you use an abrasive like silicon carbide. The most common grit sizes for etching windows and architectural size pieces are 120 to 150. For a finer finish on trophies and glassware, and use of photoresist, 180 to 220 is used. Micro blasting equipment uses 220 to 400 grit. When exclusively blasting wood or stone, the most common grits are 30 to 80. I hope that gives you some useful information about the most commonly used material in the blasting process. GP With over 40 years in the glass business, RUTH DOBBINS offers experience in all glass-etching techniques as well as in fused and cast glass. Ruth holds a Master's Degree in Art and has been a partner in an art glass wholesale supply and studio company in Europe, which also placed great emphasis on a training program, before joining forces with Norm. You can reach Ruth by email at ruth@etchmaster.com, or by phone at 505-473-9203. Right: The size of grit you use has a lot to do with the way your finished etchings look. For a finer finish on trophies and glass- ware, and use of pho- toresist, 180 to 220 is used. (Image courtesy IKONICS Imaging) Left: One version of a free-standing reclaim- er that can be retrofitted onto any blasting system. If you have a good blast cabinet or blast room in which to etch, you can use any of the abrasives that can be recycled. (Image courtesy Ruth Dobbins)

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