GRAPHICS PRO

April '21

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6 6 G R A P H I C S P R O A P R I L 2 0 2 1 G R A P H I C S - P R O. C O M I n the following article, I explain the steps of how to take your design from the computer screen to mesh for the screen-printing process, but before we do … Who and what are you design- ing for? ese are two important questions whenever starting any project. Knowing your client and their end goals with not only the design, but the type of screen printing they are looking for is crucial. KNOW YOUR CLIENT Who are they? Are they a business, not- for-prot, personal order? Knowing the client and their goal with each project al- lows you to not only build a relationship, but help them exceed their goals and val- ues with each order they place. You want to gain as much infor- mation out of the gate when writ- ing up an order. During this time, you are not just selling an order, you are getting the information for your designer to do the best they can for your client. It also helps shorten the design time. Usually when talking to a client, you can gauge the level of diculty of the design just in the conversation. Write down what they are looking for and pass this information on to your designer. is helps your design- er to not only know what the client is looking for, but to know roughly how long it should take them to set up a proof. Knowing all of this helps your team move smoothly and more quickly to meet order deadlines from start to nish. What are you designing for? You are not just designing for your customer. You are de- signing for your production team to make their job easier and to make sure the design you are creating will trans- late well from the screen mesh to the fab- ric and surface it is being printed on. When designing for your customer, stay on schedule. If you can keep your design times to 30 minutes to one hour on average with one proof and no more than one update to the proof, you are not just getting art- work out quickly, but helping your production team stay on schedule. I am not saying go fast to be fast, but if you can produce quality artwork in that time frame 75% of the time, that helps you gain ex- tra time where needed on the back end for other projects or allows you to take rush orders. STEP-BY-STEP Following, I'd like to talk a customer sce- nario to help walk you through the pro- cess. Say your customer wants 100 black shirts, sizes small through extra-large, with their supplied vector logo on the front with a white imprint, and they want you to add something to the design to make the print a lighter handle so it's not thick. Step One: Before you can start designing, read the customer's or- der and research the item you are designing for. You can go to most manufacturers' websites to not only view the products, but they usually have sizing charts. If they do not, pick up the phone and call customer service. Someone will help you get the information you need. A P P A R E L D E C O R A T I N G than one update to the proof, you are not just getting art schedule. I am not saying go fast to be fast, but if you can produce quality artwork in that time frame 75% of the Importing the logo and taking the distress pattern and overlaying it onto the logo. (All images courtesy Howard Potter) B Y H O W A R D P O T T E R Take Your Design from Computer to Screen

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