GRAPHICS PRO

June '21

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G R A P H I C S - P R O. C O M 2 0 2 1 J U N E G R A P H I C S P R O 3 3 poster (Figure 2). In this example, there are two methods used for controlling opacity: a global opacity adjustment and a layer mask. The work begins by selecting the con- tent on the topmost layer, in this case the Tarahumara dancers. A black layer mask was created to knock out the background. A white-to-black gradient fill was applied to the interior of the layer mask in order to fade the figures from top to bottom (Figure 3). Finally, a global opacity ad- justment of 75% was applied to the lay- er, endowing the dancers with a ghostly appearance. CLIPPING MASK Another method for creating a double exposure is to make a clipping mask. A content-based clipping mask knocks out the exterior areas of the content on the top layer and superimposes the content of the bottom layer within the resulting shape. Combined with additional features like blend modes, layer masks, and layer styles, this technique can result in extraor- dinary dazzling effects. This example is pretty artsy. To create a clipping mask: 1. Stack the layers so that the image you want to superimpose is on the top (Figure 4). 2. Select the content of the bottom layer. 3. Conceal the contents of the selec- tion so that the desired image is completely surrounded by transpar- ency by making a layer mask. Go to Layer>Layer Mask>Reveal Selection (Figure 5). 4. Clip the two layers together by plac- ing the curser between the two lay- ers and press Option (Mac) or Alt (Win). You'll see the Clipping Mask icon. Then click the mouse. The top layer content is superimposed into the shape of the bottom layer (Figure 6). 5. Experiment with color and trans- parency by applying a blend mode Figure 4. Stack the layers so that the image you want to superimpose is on the top. Figure 5 (left). Conceal the contents of the selection with a layer mask so that the desired image is completely surrounded by transparency. Figure 6 (right). With a clipping mask, the top layer content is superimposed into the shape of the bottom layer. Figure 7. The red forest background is the top layer copied with reduced opacity and dragged to the bottom of the stack.

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