GRAPHICS PRO

July '21

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G R A P H I C S - P R O. C O M 2 0 2 1 J U L Y G R A P H I C S P R O 8 7 disciplines apply and have a uniquely similar correlation between channel let- ter fabrication and small fonts that dis- appear when the logo is one inch across. For the courtesy and consideration of the designers out there who may have done their best to design a logo for some- one, I simply cannot show examples of badly designed logos within this article. Nobody likes having their past mistakes brought up as a training exercise, so I am choosing to simply discuss what to do right, rather than pointing out what's been done wrong. You can see several ex- amples of logos done correctly for outdoor use above and on page 86. FINAL THOUGHTS So, to wrap things up: • Print/screen/tablet/monitor-viewed graphic design is a discipline that allows the designer to use more con- tent, smaller text, and more detailed graphics because the viewer has time to look at all of the design. • Designing a sign is primarily for out- door viewing applications, other than when signs are made for communi- cating safety or regulatory informa- tion in close-quarter areas. • Using the squint test to vet your de- signs will help you maintain the most readability for font choices. • Knowing the audience demographics and their likes and dislikes helps with both sign design and website, bro- chure, and print media design. • Fonts make the largest impact in how readable your sign design is once it's outside. Fonts can also create a mood or feeling that can help or hurt the business. • Color, contrast, and space are the elements that help the proper fonts be seen and read from a distance better than fonts that blend into the background. • Kerning and font spacing, line spac- ing, and the proper use of descend- ing letters (j, g, y, etc.) must be carefully planned for not only the look and layout, but the fabrication restrictions. • Designing the sizzle to sell the steak can help you provide sign designs that go beyond the ordinary to ex- plore the extraordinary. GP MATT CHARBONEAU started his career in the sign industry in 1985 as Charboneau Signs. In 2017 he pub- lished the Pre-Sale Sign Survey Field Guide. In 2019 he started Storm Mountain Signs and the Sign Design In- stitute. Contact him at Matt@stormmountainsigns.com; www.stormmountainsigns.com; and 970-481-4151. Left: Bold font, heavy contrast, but for this one, I de- signed a unique icon, which if you look closely, you will see the goose flying above the elk-style rack that makes up the chef's hat. Right: In this example, the established ram's head icon and CSU text were a given. Adding the text above the iconic ram's head created a bold, recogniz- able icon, which is what the university wanted for this mark. Kerning was a nightmare that I still am not fully happy with. Left: Bold font, heavy contrast, but for this one, I de Bold font, heavy contrast, but for this one, I de Bold font, heavy contrast, but for this one, I de able icon, which is what the university wanted for this mark.

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