GRAPHICS PRO

August '21

Issue link: https://nbm.uberflip.com/i/1362649

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 54 of 102

Kicker HEADLINE SUBHEAD 5 0 G R A P H I C S P R O A U G U S T 2 0 2 1 G R A P H I C S - P R O. C O M S I G N A G E & P R I N T I N G C O L U M N T I T L E | A U T H O R N A M E 5 0 G R A P H I C S P R O A U G U S T 2 0 2 1 G R A P H I C S - P R O. C O M S I G N A G E & P R I N T I N G R A M B L I N G S F R O M T H E A T E L I E R | M A T T T O U C H A R D N o matter your age or who you are, certain iconic images are indelibly imprinted in your brain. Perhaps it was the instant you saw the smiley face, an omnipresent, cultural fixture for de- cades as attributed to Franklin Loufrani. Maybe it was the poster of Farrah Fawcett with her "it" girl gaze, coiffed with an anti- gravity '70s feathered shag. For others, the lasting effect courtesy of Mickey Mouse and Pluto, The Beatles and Duran Duran, the two Marilyns (Monroe or Manson), or even the nightmares delivered by the Creature from the Black Lagoon. These images resonate within your psyche, eliciting an emotional re- sponse or approval, because the most profound images are easy to visualize again and again. World culture is awash with aesthetic beauty, be it the genera- tional paintings of the Lascaux Cave in Montignac, France, to the bombast of Andy Warhol's pop art serigraphs, to the starkly sublime, sensual, monochro- matic photography of Helmut Newton. Art, it appears, has its place as both hand-drawn images and mechanically aided products. It's all valid; it moves the viewer and, therefore, sells the idea. THE OBSERVATIONAL FORCE OF ART As a modern-day graphics professional, what's your go-to approach: photog- raphy or illustrated art? Somewhere, somehow through the centuries, we humans went from appreciating time- less, distinctive images created (mainly) by artists that often transcended gen- erations to pumping out billions of (mostly) clichéd images each year — an estimated 100,000 new, commer- cial photographs are uploaded to stock photo agency Alamy daily via the ever-in- creasing cacophony of mobile phones and personal devices. We are inundated with images by the minute, and most are quickly forgotten within seconds. Did our manic society err and if so, how do you fix it in the small corner of your dolce vita? To find salvation in this hurried, digital landscape, one only needs to look to Vitru- vian Man (an iconic drawing) as well as the most famous mug of all-time: the Mona Lisa. Or rather, her creator. Leonardo da Vinci, 15th century prolific illustrator, painter, sculptor, and all-around Man of the World, was the first guy that donned the relaxed-fit T-shirt with the words "The Original Renaissance Man" printed across the chest. A chronic procras- tinator, da Vinci's work always exemplified clarity and refinement. Your work should embrace the same ideals: clear and refined, though not tardy. His commissions, caricatures, and detailed sketches provided strong concepts before final work was executed. Whether it was an exquisitely detailed painting or architectural design, through THE POWER OF PHOTOGRAPHY; THE INTRIGUE OF ILLUSTRATION USING ONE, THE OTHER, OR BOTH TO CREATE DYNAMIC PROJETCS For a glimpse into what to expect in a forthcoming guitar book, the only way to capture each guitar model and its era was through photography — for book tour support in large-scale wall pieces that rock. (Image courtesy Matt Toucha- rd and Ron Calamia) For a glimpse into what to expect in a forthcoming guitar book, the only way to capture each guitar model and its era

Articles in this issue

view archives of GRAPHICS PRO - August '21