GRAPHICS PRO

October '21

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1 0 2 G R A P H I C S P R O O C T O B E R 2 0 2 1 G R A P H I C S - P R O. C O M S I G N A G E & P R I N T I N G T H E D I G I T A L E Y E is not easy and requires knowing a scripting language. If you're interested in writing scripts, application-specific guides will help you learn the process. In the commercial large-format printing environment there are a lot of automated tasks that can be made more efficient with actions, automa- tions, and scripts. It might be worth the effort to learn basic scripting or perhaps hire a programmer to write several scripts of the sequences you use most often. At the very least start by compiling and saving actions that you can apply to images to streamline your workflow. Let's look at a couple of automa- tions that in my opinion are most useful. Automations not only obviate repetitive commands; they also can po- tentially enhance the quality of your im- ages. They reside in the file > automate menu waiting to be discovered. You can also find some of them in Adobe Bridge. BATCH … Automations come in a variety of forms. Looking at the file > automate menu (Fig. 4), you'll see 10 automations. Batch, at the top of the menu, applies an action to several images and is a fantastic time-saver. The batch dialog box specifies the action, the source folder (where the images are stored), and the destination of where the new processed images will be saved. I can't stress enough how learning to use this feature can lighten your workload. As an example, I'll use my The Digital Eye writing expe- rience to show you how batching lets me quickly format images for publication. Fig. 4: Looking at the file > automate menu, you'll see 10 automations. Fig. 4: Looking at the file > automate menu, you'll see 10 automations. Fig. 3: Graphics software packages also contain script and automation features that trigger a JavaScript when opening, saving, or exporting a file. Fig. 5: The actions panel with the recorded sequence. Fig. 5: The actions panel with the recorded sequence.

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