RV PRO

May '21

Issue link: https://nbm.uberflip.com/i/1364311

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 72 of 104

66 • RV PRO • May 2021 rv-pro.com floor of the unit to allow an unimpeded area to run water lines, electrical wiring and ductwork. "Now, we can get twice the CFMs (cubic feet per minute) out of some of our ducts in the floor compared to our competitors because it's a straight run," Runels says. "In a lot of fifth wheels, a lot of other builders use cellophane ducting – dryer ducting – to get around in a chassis that's packed with crossmembers, water tanks, axles, slide-out rams. All of that has been taken out of the way. Plus, it's all run with metal plenums, just like in a house." Another benefit is the ability to insulate that cavity and not just the underbelly (which also is done on the Arcadia). Maintaining a more consistent temperature in this channel allows for more efficiency from the ducting. The dropped crossmembers also allowed for additional longi- tudinal supports. "Now, there's always something to anchor an island kitchen to," Runels said. "Previously, depending upon where the crossmembers were, there wasn't always something to anchor it to besides the floor." The upper portion of the fifth wheel chassis also was altered. What started as a Lippert "Space Saver Upper Deck" design – which, says Runels, removes much of the cage that redistributes the pressure caused by the pin box hitch pin, thereby freeing up additional space for the interior closet – was modified to angle the sides of the 6- by 6-inch front beam. The angled configuration provides for a greater turning radius (up to 93 degrees) without the fifth wheel front cap hitting the truck cab. Other upgrades to the framework include the use of Keystone's proprietary nonorganic Hyperdeck in all Arcadia models. Every- thing on the Arcadia is laminate except for the roof, Runels says – as well as Astrofoil to insulate the underbelly and strapped-in holding tanks. "The tanks are still mounted traditionally, bolted into place, but we strap them in place, as well," he says. "Because they are roto-molded tanks, if they are overfilled they can potentially bulge and split, so by strapping them in place we add a second level of support." The Arcadia's patented NGC2 Next-Generation Crawlspace Chassis, which was developed in-house, is the lynchpin of the fifth wheel's ground-up reimagining. It was built around a typical 10-inch extruded I-beam frame and features crossmembers that sit nearly 3 inches below the level of the outer I-beams. That creates a channel, or "crawl space," between the supporting crossmembers and the floor of the unit to allow an unimpeded area to run water lines, electrical wiring and ductwork. Pictured here is the fifth wheel's front frame. That frame, christened the Space Saver Upper Deck, features an angled configuration that provides for a greater turning radius (up to 93 degrees) without the fifth wheel front cap hitting the truck cab. " Our goal was: We wanted something in every area of the Arcadia that, aesthetically or feature-wise, would be different, that we could pitch as an improvement over our competition." – Jeff Runels, Keystone RV president and CEO

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

view archives of RV PRO - May '21