Sign & Digital Graphics

May '18

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6 • May 2018 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S __________________________________________ Publisher James "Ruggs" Kochevar – ruggs@nbm.com Executive Editor Ken Mergentime – kenm@nbm.com Managing Editor Matt Dixon – mdixon@nbm.com Digital Content Editor Tony Kindelspire – tkindelspire@nbm.com __________________________________________ Art Director Linda Cranston Graphic Artist Iveth Gomez Multimedia Producer Andrew Bennett __________________________________________ Advertising Account Executives Erin Geddis – egeddis@nbm.com Diane Gilbert – dgilbert@nbm.com Sara Siauw – ssiauw@nbm.com Sales Support Dana Korman – dkorman@nbm.com __________________________________________ Contributors in this Issue: Vince DiCecco; Ryan Fugler; Paula Aven Gladych; Charity Jackson; Stephen Romaniello; Bill Schiffner; Steven Vigeant; Shelley Widhalm; Rick Williams ___________________________________________ Vice President/Events Sue Hueg CEM, CMP – susan@nbm.com Show Sales Damon Cincotta – dcincotta@nbm.com Exhibitor Services Janet Cain – Jcain@nbm.com Tyler Wigginton – Twigginton@nbm.com ____________________________________________ National Business Media, Inc. President & CEO Robert H. Wieber Jr. Vice President/Integrated Media John Bennett Vice President/Finance Kori Gonzales, CPA Vice President/Publishing and Markets Dave Pomeroy Vice President/Audience Lori Farstad Director of IT Wolf Butler B Y K E N M E R G E N T I M E The Long View A s a sign shop or commercial graphics provider, you likely get many kinds of promotional projects to fulfill—product rollouts, special sales programs, incentive membership promotions and brand- ing programs. In most cases, if you have a good design department, you'll be discussing with the client the goal of the program, what message they want to emphasize and the various ways you see to best accomplish that. In the case of a branding program, you tell them that their logo can't be too complex and should represent the client in a clear, directly identifiable way. You emphasize that a tag line with the logo can be used, but again must emphasize only the single most important element of the company. Yes, that's all well and good, but what about your own brand? How much effort and thought have you put into developing and promoting your shop's brand? Whether you think you even have a "brand" to promote or not, your shop's brand is your ticket to standing out from the crowd. But your brand is so much more than your company name or logo. It's the experience that your custom- ers have with your company at every single point of interaction. Think about that for a minute. Each and every aspect of your branding signage tells your customer what your company is all about, delivering both the message of who you are and the products or services you offer. Your on-premises branding signage should always be treated with as much care as the logo itself. When it comes to your physical shop, branding signage is one of the most critical components of an effective brand strategy. As a shop owner, over the years you have already created your identity through your quality product, impeccable service and on-time delivery. Branding that iden- tity helps cement in your clients' (and prospective clients') minds the fact that you offer consistency of quality and good value. Okay, so beyond your on-premises signage and your great logo, how else do you promote your brand? Well, your website should be a mirror reflection of your brand, your shop's sales area should be clean, professional and not overly cluttered. Your shop truck should be a further reflection of who you are—wrapped or lettered with your logo and branding message. When you do a presentation or bid on a job, make sure your logo and tag line are visible on the proposal pages and spec sheets. Any advertising you do for your- self should include your logo. You can even place your logo on finished work you do, as long as it's inconspicuous and the client approves. But why am I telling you all this—you already do it for your customers on a regular basis. Well, if you already haven't done so, maybe it's time you took your own advice and developed a great brand for your own shop. It'll pay huge dividends in the long run. Okay, back to work. Branding Your Brand Got something to say? Join the S&DG Discussion Group at:

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