Sign & Digital Graphics

June '18

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6 • June 2018 • S I G N & D I G I T A L G R A P H I C S __________________________________________ Publisher James "Ruggs" Kochevar – ruggs@nbm.com Executive Editor Ken Mergentime – kenm@nbm.com Managing Editor Matt Dixon – mdixon@nbm.com Digital Content Editor Tony Kindelspire – tkindelspire@nbm.com __________________________________________ Art Director Linda Cranston Graphic Artist Iveth Gomez Multimedia Producer Andrew Bennett __________________________________________ Advertising Account Executives Erin Geddis – egeddis@nbm.com Diane Gilbert – dgilbert@nbm.com Sara Siauw – ssiauw@nbm.com Sales Support Dana Korman – dkorman@nbm.com __________________________________________ Contributors in this Issue: Vince DiCecco; Scott Franko; Ryan Fugler; Paula Aven Gladych; Charity Jackson; Larry Oberly; Stephen Romaniello; Bill Schiffner; Steven Vigeant; Rick Williams ___________________________________________ Vice President/Events Sue Hueg CEM, CMP – susan@nbm.com Show Sales Damon Cincotta – dcincotta@nbm.com Exhibitor Services Janet Cain – Jcain@nbm.com Tyler Wigginton – Twigginton@nbm.com ____________________________________________ National Business Media, Inc. President & CEO Robert H. Wieber Jr. Vice President/Integrated Media John Bennett Vice President/Finance Kori Gonzales, CPA Vice President/Publishing and Markets Dave Pomeroy Vice President/Audience Lori Farstad Director of IT Wolf Butler B Y K E N M E R G E N T I M E The Long View W hen you head up a sign or commercial graphics shop—espe- cially if you are the owner/proprietor—it's up to you to set the tone and direction of the business, and to help your staff to be suc- cessful. If they are successful, then the business is successful. It makes perfect sense. But in order to do that you not only have to be a smart business person who is willing to invest and take calculated risks, you also have to get your employees to consistently produce exceptional work and deliver stellar customer service. Your staff looks to you for guidance and needs to be able to trust that you know what you're doing. In other words, you must lead. But what does it really mean to lead? They say the best leaders lead by example. By walking your talk, you become a person others want to follow. When leaders say one thing, but do another, they erode trust—a critical element of productive leader- ship. A good leader takes responsibility for his actions, is truthful, courageous in a crisis, and is not afraid to acknowledge failure. A good leader never seeks to blame others for unfavorable outcomes, never dis- counts the perspectives or emotions of others—doesn't dwell too much on problems and understands his own strengths and weaknesses. A good leader isn't afraid to roll up his/her sleeves and get in the trenches to help out when needed. A good leader knows how to teach, how to listen, asks rel- evant questions and seeks to understand. Great leaders have an achievement orien- tation that is laser focused on the greater good—and doesn't waste energy shining up their image just to make themselves look good. The best leaders are optimistic, never panic in front of employees and have enough confidence in the staff to delegate liberally. Great leaders seek out original solutions, new ideas and silver linings, even in the worst of times. Successful leaders are unafraid to employ their own emotional intelligence to help resolve employee conflicts. They don't shy away from this duty and don't pre- tend there is no problem when there is one. Finally, a good leader thinks of his or her company as a team, where team effort gets things done, where cooperation and dedication to quality are the bywords of success. They never isolate themselves from their staff, never drive a wedge in an effort to divide and conquer—that is the realm of failing leaders. The best leaders inspire by setting the example of mutual respect—they are not only driven, but are intimately involved—with the work, with the clients and espe- cially with the people who make up the industry they love. Go ahead. Be a great leader. Okay, back to work. The Qualities of Leadership Got something to say? Join the S&DG Discussion Group at:

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